Saturday, February 5, 2011

How to Write a Career Summary and Achievements in Your Resume

Competition in every field for jobs has become so high and the recruiters are very busy that it has become a necessity to show some sort of edge in your resume that would make you noticed in a large pool of equally talented people.

If you are a fresher, then your job hunt becomes even more difficult, because of the increase in number of freshers who pass out every day. Get a job is very difficult in off-campus than in on-campus.

Getting noticed among thousands is an essential part and begins with writing an attractive career summary. The target here is to create a compulsive and irresistible introduction that is packed with your exemplary skills, achievements and abilities related to the job you apply to.

Make the career summary into a condensed content of around a hundred words so that your recruiter need not spend too much time to know about you.

Here are some tips to make an engaging career summary.

1. Find your ideal job

Make a thorough study of the direction in which you want your career to travel. This is the first step towards your future and makes the foundation of your entire future career; hence a clear decision is needed.

When you narrow down your search, your target audience becomes less. Thus it becomes easier to convey your capability better.

2. Place the career summary in the beginning

When you put the career summary where your recruiters eyes would fall first, the chance of your resume being picked up from a pile of resumes stacked together becomes more.

Most recruiters would browse your resume for just a few seconds. These 10 to 15 seconds decide whether your resume would be read further or fail completely.

That is why it is important for you to place your best points in the beginning of your resume.

3. Don’t go overboard with adjectives

Do not add too many adjectives to your skills. This may act as a turn off rather than attracting the reader. Simple words such as highly motivated, accomplished or award winning compel your readers to read further than complicated adjectives.

4. Tell how the company would benefit from your expertise

Convey in subtle words what you can do to bring about a positive development to the company. This not only shows off your talent but also makes a statement of the research you have conducted about the company out of your own interest.

This would naturally add value to your credentials.

5. Focus on the job you are applying for

When writing objectives, always target on a single goal. This gives you space to specify your skills in the required field in a broader and compulsive manner.

You can use bullet points of your key skills highlighting them so that they catch the attention of your recruiters easily.

6. Edit, re-edit and proofread

This is the most vital part of any resume. Any number of skills or years of experience when presented with spelling errors, gives a wrong impression of your nature to attend to details.

This would naturally affect your appointment. Hence, always make sure to check for typo errors after getting the resume typed. You can ask a friend to check for you so that the minor mistakes that you might have overlooked too may be corrected.

Get the printout in good quality paper typed professionally so that you may not have to face any kind of disappointment or embarrassment at any point of time. Use laser printers rather than ink jet or dot matrix printers.

Always remember, your resume is going to represent you to your prospective employers, it can make or break your career. A well written career summary would be very effective in engaging the readers further and try to know about your complete profile.

3 comments:

chandra said...

Great overview !I think that this is very helpful advice to keep in mind.


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arumugam said...

Great thoughts you got there, believe I may possibly try just some of it throughout my daily life.




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8051 projects said...

Excellent ideas, clean and clear presentation, great sharing, useful tooo.....





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